• Learn the Language of the Kingdom!

    Here you'll find basic information about the Hebrew alphabet, vowels, and Biblical Hebrew grammar so that you can better understand the Scriptures from a Hebraic point of view. Join me in my Bet Midrash (house of study), and progress from knowing not one letter of Hebrew to reading and speaking it with confidence!
    In addition to learning Biblical Hebrew grammar, this site provides information about common Hebrew blessings and Jewish prayers, the Hebrew Scriptures (Tanakh), the Jewish holidays, and weekly Torah portions from a Messianic point of view. The Hebrew Names of God, as well as an online glossary of Hebrew and Yiddish terms is also provided. Be sure to check out the online store for some excellent study materials!

    Biblical Hebrew -

    Overview of the Grammar Section of Hebrew for Christians

    This section is intended to help you become familiar with the rudiments of Biblical Hebrew so that you can:

     1.   Familiarize yourself with Hebrew concepts and the Hebraic mindset that underlies the Scriptures (including the Brit Chadashah, or New Testament).
     2.   Use Hebrew language tools in your study of the Bible.
     3.   Become better acquainted with Jewish heritage and your inheritance as one "grafted in" to the Root (Messiah) of Israel (Romans 9-11).
      4.  Remove the linguistic veil that separates your English translations from the original Scriptures (including plays on words, word origins, the use of acrostics, Jewish idioms, and word pictures).
     5.   Deepen your appreciation and love for Israel and your shared destiny with God's original covenant people.
    6.    Better discern various Messianic Jewish schools of thought and to more viably "test the spirits" to see if they are from God.
    7.    Enhance your understanding and appreciation of the manifold wisdom and grace of God Almighty.

    If you are new to the study of Biblical Hebrew, you should first work through the "mechanics" of the language: the alphabet, the vowel marks, and the syllables (Units 1 through 3). After mastering this foundational material, you will be ready to read and pronounce Hebrew words! (Unit 4)

    After learning the mechanics of the language, you can then directly begin studying Hebrew grammar (dikduk) and begin exploring the rich spiritual vocabulary of Biblical Hebrew (Units 5-10). You will also be equipped to perform rudimentary word studies, to recite the most common Hebrew blessings and prayers, and to take delight in meditating on aspects of the Scripture that might have eluded you had you not begun to dig deeper into the language.

    May the Lord God of Israel, the Father of the blessed Mashiach (Messiah) Jesus, bless you as you seek to "study to show thyself approved unto God, a workman that needeth not be ashamed, rightly dividing the Word of Truth" (2 Tim. 2:15).

    Grammar

    uint one


    Hebrew is called a "consonantal" language because its words are formed from root letters that remain the same regardless of grammatical form. Vowel marks were added later by the Tiberian scribes in order to retain the memory of original vocalization but are not considered basic to the language.

    Objective:


        After studying this unit, you should be able to read, write, and recite the entire Hebrew Aleph-Bet, both in print letters and in modern Hebrew script. Start with Section 1.1 and down move through the list.

    Unit Two: The Vowels


    Hebrew is a consonantal language. Vowel marks were introduced to facilitate learning how to read and pronounce words.

    Simple Vowel Template


        After studying this unit, you should be able to read, write, and recite the the Hebrew vowel system. Start with Section 2.1 and down move through the list.

    Unit Three: SyllablesIn order to properly pronounce a Hebrew word, you will need to understand how the word is divided into syllables (i.e., units of distinct sound).
    Word Division
        After studying this unit, you should be able to begin reading, writing, and reciting Hebrew words. Start with Section 3.1 and down

    Unit Four: Hebrew Nouns
    Just as in English, a Hebrew noun is a name of a person, place, or thing. This section will introduce you to the Hebrew noun: its morphology and basic usage.
    After studying this unit, you will understand the basic grammar of the noun in biblical Hebrew, as well as the definite article, the conjunction, and the use of Hebrew "word pairs" (construct chain). You also should be able to begin using a Hebrew lexicon to begin learning common noun forms you will see in the Tanakh.

    Unit Five: Adjectives
    An adjective is a word that is used to describe or qualify a noun. Hebrew adjectives function similarly to English adjectives.

    After studying this unit, you should be able to understand the basic grammar of the adjective in biblical Hebrew and begin identifying various adjectival phrases and constructions in the scriptures.

    Unit Six: PronounsA pronoun is a word that stands in place of ("pro") a noun. The word for which a pronoun stands (or refers back to) is called the antecedent of the pronoun.
    After studying this unit, you should be able to understand the basic grammar of the pronoun in Biblical Hebrew and begin identifying various pronomial phrases and constructions in the Scriptures.

    Unit Seven: Prepositions
    A preposition is a connecting word that indicates a relationship between one word (called its object) and another word (called its antecedent).
    After studying this unit, you should be able to understand the basic grammar of the preposition in Biblical Hebrew and begin identifying various prepositional phrases and constructions in the Scriptures.

    Unit Eight: NumbersA number is a sort of adjective that defines the quality of quantity.
    After studying this unit, you should be able to understand the basic grammar of the numbers in Biblical Hebrew and begin identifying various numerical constructions in the Scriptures.

    Unit Nine: Present TenseBiblical Hebrew thus has basically two tenses: Perfect (action is complete) and imperfect (incomplete). The present tense is expressed through the use of participles.
    After studying this unit, you should be able to understand the basic grammar of the Qal ("light") participle.

    Unit Ten: Simple Past Tense
    A verb is a word used to describe an action or state of being. Hebrew is essentially a verbal language, since most of its